Documentation

This is machine translation

Translated by Microsoft
Mouseover text to see original. Click the button below to return to the English verison of the page.

Note: This page has been translated by MathWorks. Please click here
To view all translated materals including this page, select Japan from the country navigator on the bottom of this page.

geod2geoc

Convert geodetic latitude to geocentric latitude

Syntax

gc = geod2geoc(gd, h)
gc = geod2geoc(gd, h, model)
gc = geod2geoc(gd, h, f, Re)

Description

gc = geod2geoc(gd, h) converts an array of m geodetic latitudes, gd, and an array of mean sea level altitudes, h, into an array of m geocentric latitudes, gc. h is in meters. Latitude values can be any value. However, values of +90 and -90 may return unexpected values because of singularity at the poles.

gc = geod2geoc(gd, h, model) is an alternate method for converting from geodetic to geocentric latitude for a specific ellipsoid planet. Currently only 'WGS84' is supported for model. Latitude values can be any value. However, values of +90 and -90 may return unexpected values because of singularity at the poles.

gc = geod2geoc(gd, h, f, Re) is another alternate method for converting from geodetic to geocentric latitude for a custom ellipsoid planet defined by flattening, f, and the equatorial radius, Re, in meters. Latitude values can be any value. However, values of +90 and -90 may return unexpected values because of singularity at the poles.

Examples

Determine geocentric latitude given a geodetic latitude and altitude:

gc = geod2geoc(45, 1000)


gc =

   44.8076

Determine geocentric latitude at multiple geodetic latitudes and altitudes, specifying WGS84 ellipsoid model:

gc = geod2geoc([0 45 90], [1000 0 2000], 'WGS84')


gc =

         0
   44.8076
   90.0000

Determine geocentric latitude at multiple geodetic latitudes, given an altitude and specifying custom ellipsoid model:

f = 1/196.877360;
Re = 3397000;
gc = geod2geoc([0 45 90], 2000, f, Re)


gc =

         0
   44.7084
   90.0000

Assumptions and Limitations

This implementation generates a geocentric latitude that lies between ±90 degrees.

References

Stevens, B. L., and F. L. Lewis, Aircraft Control and Simulation, John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY, 1992

Introduced in R2006b

Was this topic helpful?