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Legacy Interface Using All Devices

Installed Adaptors

Use daqhwinfo to discover installed National Instruments® adaptors. If the daqhwinfo('nidaq') command returns a warning, you have devices that require you to use the Session-Based Interface.

Warning: Devices were detected that require the DAQ Session Based Interface.
For more information, see documentation on the session-based interface
 

ans = 

           AdaptorDllName: [1x103 char]
        AdaptorDllVersion: '3.0 (R2011b Prerelease)'
              AdaptorName: 'nidaq'
               BoardNames: {1x14 cell}
        InstalledBoardIds: {1x14 cell}
    ObjectConstructorName: {14x3 cell}

Advantech Hardware

    Note:   You can use Advantech® hardware only with the legacy interface.

Driver Version

Data Acquisition Toolbox™ software is compatible only with specific versions of Advantech drivers and is not guaranteed to work with any other versions. For a list of the Advantech driver versions that are compatible with Data Acquisition Toolbox software, refer to the product page on the MathWorks Web site at http://www.mathworks.com/products/daq/supportedio.html and click on the link for this vendor.

If you think your driver is incompatible with Data Acquisition Toolbox software, you should verify that your hardware is functioning properly before updating drivers. If your hardware is not functioning properly, then you are probably using unsupported drivers. For the latest drivers, visit the Advantech Web site at http://www.advantech.com/.

With the Advantech Device Manager, you can find out which version of Advantech drivers you are using. You should be able to access this program though the Windows® desktop.

To see if a specific version of a driver is installed on your system, select the type of device in the Supported Devices list, and click About.

Hardware Performance

To troubleshoot your Advantech hardware, you use the Advantech Device Test dialog box. This dialog box allows you to test each subsystem supported by your board, and is installed as part of the Advantech Device Manager. To access the Advantech Device Test dialog box from the Advantech Device Manager, select the appropriate device in the Installed Devices list, and click Test.

For example, suppose you want to verify that the analog input subsystem on your PCI-1710 board is operating correctly. To do this, connect a known signal, such as that produced by a function generator, to one or more channels using a screw terminal panel.

If the Advantech Device Test dialog box does not provide you with the expected results for the subsystem under test, and you are sure that your test setup is configured correctly, then the problem is probably in the hardware.

To get support for your Advantech hardware, visit their Web site at http://www.advantech.com/.

Measurement Computing Hardware

    Note:   You can use Measurement Computing™ hardware only with the legacy interface.

Driver Version

Data Acquisition Toolbox software is compatible only with specific versions of the Universal Library drivers or the associated release of the InstaCal software, and is not guaranteed to work with any other versions. For a list of the driver versions that are compatible with Data Acquisition Toolbox software, refer to the product page on the MathWorks Web site at http://www.mathworks.com/products/daq/supportedio.html and click on the link for this vendor.

If you think your driver is incompatible with Data Acquisition Toolbox software, then you should verify that your hardware is functioning properly before updating drivers. If your hardware is not functioning properly, then you are probably using unsupported drivers. Visit the Measurement Computing Web site at http://www.measurementcomputing.com/ for the latest drivers.

To find the version of the driver you are using with Measurement Computing's InstaCal, select
Start > Programs > Measurement Computing > InstaCal.

The driver version is available through the Help menu.

Select Help > About InstaCal.

Hardware Performance

To troubleshoot your Measurement Computing hardware, you should use the test feature provided by InstaCal. To access this feature, select the board you want to test from the PC Board List, and select Analog from the Test menu.

For example, suppose you want to verify that the analog input subsystem on your PCI-DAS4020/12 board is operating correctly. To do this, you should connect a known signal — such as that produced by a function generator — to one of the channels, using a BNC cable.

If InstaCal does not provide you with the expected results for the subsystem under test, and you are sure that your test setup is configured correctly, then the problem is probably with the hardware.

To get support for your Measurement Computing hardware, visit their Web site at http://www.measurementcomputing.com/.

Sound Cards

Test Your Sound Card

Record some data and then play it back to verify that your sound card is functioning. When you record data, you use the sound card's analog input subsystem. When you play data back, you use the sound card's analog output subsystem. If you successfully record and play data back, your sound card works. You can record data from:

  • A microphone

  • A CD player

To test your sound card, enable its ability to record and play data. In the Windows desktop:

  1. Select Start > Settings > Control Panel.

  2. Double-click Sounds and Audio Devices.

  3. Enable both data play back and recording.

Use the Windows Sound Recorder panel to record data and then play it back:

  1. Select Start > Programs > Accessories > Entertainment > Sound Recorder.

Make sure that your microphone or CD player is enabled for recording and playback:

  1. Select Start > Programs > Accessories > Entertainment > Volume Control

  2. Clear the Mute check box for these sound devices:

    • CD

    • Microphone

    • Line

  3. To play .WAV files, clear the Mute check box for the Wave sound device.

If you don't see the CD, microphone, or Wave Output controls in the Volume Control panel, select Properties from the Options menu to modify the playback properties.

To verify if the CD and microphone are enabled for recording, click the Recording option in the Properties dialog box, and then select the appropriate device check box to enable recording. The Properties dialog box is shown below for recording devices.

The Recording Control panel is shown below. You enable the CD or microphone for recording when the Select check box is selected for the CD or Microphone controls, respectively.

Microphone and Sound Card Types

Your microphone will be one of two possible types: powered or unpowered. You can use powered microphones only with Sound Blaster or Sound Blaster-compatible microphone inputs. You can use unpowered microphones with any sound card microphone input. Some laptops must use unpowered microphones because they do not have Sound Blaster compatible sound cards.

As shown below, you can easily identify these two microphone types by their jacks.

You can find out which sound card brand you have installed by clicking the Devices tab on the Sounds and Audio Devices Properties dialog box. Refer to Sound Cards for a picture of this dialog box.

Test with a Microphone

To test your sound card with a microphone, follow these steps:

  1. Plug the microphone into the appropriate sound card jack. For a Sound Blaster sound card, this jack is labeled MIC IN.

  2. Record audio data by selecting the Record button on the Sound Recorder and then speak into the microphone. While recording, the green line in the Sound Recorder should indicate that data is being captured. If this is the case, then the analog input subsystem on your sound card is functioning properly.

  3. After recording the audio data, save it to disk. The data is automatically saved as a .WAV file.

  4. Play the saved .WAV file. While playing, the green line in the Sound Recorder should indicate that data is being captured. If this is the case, then the analog output subsystem on your sound card is functioning properly.

If you are not able to record or play data, make sure that the sound card and input devices are enabled for recording and playback as described in the beginning of this section.

Test with a CD Player

To test your sound card with a CD player, follow these steps:

  1. Check that your CD is physically connected to your sound card.

    • Open your computer and locate the back of the CD player.

    • If there is a wire connecting the Audio Out CD port with the sound card, you can record audio data from your CD. If there is no wire connecting your CD and sound card, you must either make this connection or use the microphone to record data.

  2. Put an audio CD into your CD player. A Windows CD player application should automatically start and begin playing the CD.

  3. While the CD is playing, record audio data by clicking the Record button on the Sound Recorder. While recording, the green line in the Sound Recorder should indicate that data is being captured. If this is the case, the analog input subsystem on your sound card is functioning properly. Note that the CD player converts digital audio data to analog audio data. Therefore, the CD sends analog data to the sound card.

  4. After recording the audio data, save it to disk. The data is automatically saved as a .WAV file.

  5. Play the saved .WAV file. While playing, the green line in the Sound Recorder should indicate that data is being captured. If this is the case, then the analog output subsystem on your sound card is functioning properly.

If you are not able to record or play data, make sure that the sound card and input devices are enabled for recording and playback as described in the beginning of this section.

Run in Full-Duplex Mode

The term full duplex refers to a system that can send and receive information simultaneously. For sound cards, full duplex means that the device can acquire input data via an analog input subsystem while outputting data via an analog output subsystem at the same time.

Note that full tells you nothing about the bit resolution or the number of channels used in each direction. Therefore, sound cards can simultaneously receive and send data using 8 or 16 bits while in mono or stereo mode. A common restriction of full-duplex mode is that both subsystems must be configured for the same sampling rate.

If you try to run your card in full duplex mode and the following error is returned,

?? Error using ==> daqdevice/start
Device 'Winsound' already in use.

then your sound card is not configured properly, it does not support this mode, or you don't have the correct driver installed.

If your card supports full-duplex mode, then you might need to enable this feature through the Sounds and Audio Devices Properties dialog box. Refer to Sound Cards for a picture of this dialog box. If you are unsure about the full-duplex capabilities of your sound card, refer to its specification sheet or user manual. It is usually very easy to update your hardware drivers to the latest version by visiting the vendor's Web site.

Other Manufacturers

For issues with hardware from any vendor other than Advantech, Measurement Computing, National Instruments, or sound cards go to the supported hardware page and go to the appropriate vendor page for help.

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