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Primitive Surface Properties

Control primitive surface appearance and behavior

Primitive surface properties control the appearance and behavior of primitive surface objects. By changing property values, you can modify certain aspects of the primitive surface.

Starting in R2014b, you can use dot notation to query and set properties.

s = surface;
c = s.CData;
s.CDataMapping = 'direct';

If you are using an earlier release, use the get and set functions instead.

Faces

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Face color, specified as one of these values:

  • 'flat' — Use uniform face colors. Use the CData values. The color data at the first vertex determines the color for the entire face. You cannot use this value when the FaceAlpha property is set to 'interp'.

  • 'interp' — Interpolate the face colors. Bilinear interpolation of the CData values at each vertex determines the colors. You cannot use this value when the FaceAlpha property is set to 'flat'.

  • 'none' — Do not draw the faces.

  • 'texturemap' — Transform the color data in CData so that it conforms to the surface.

  • RGB triplet or character vector of a color name — Use the same color for all of the faces.

An RGB triplet is a three-element row vector whose elements specify the intensities of the red, green, and blue components of the color. The intensities must be in the range [0,1]; for example, [0.4 0.6 0.7]. This table lists the long and short color name options and the equivalent RGB triplet values.

Long NameShort NameRGB Triplet
'yellow''y'[1 1 0]
'magenta''m'[1 0 1]
'cyan''c'[0 1 1]
'red''r'[1 0 0]
'green''g'[0 1 0]
'blue''b'[0 0 1]
'white''w'[1 1 1]
'black''k'[0 0 0]

Face transparency, specified as one of these values:

  • Scalar in range [0,1] — Use uniform transparency across all of the faces. A value of 1 is fully opaque and 0 is completely transparent. Values between 0 and 1 are semitransparent. This option does not use the transparency values in the AlphaData property.

  • 'flat' — Use a different transparency for each face based on the values in the AlphaData property. First you must specify the AlphaData property as a matrix the same size as the ZData property. The transparency value at the first vertex determines the transparency for the entire face. The FaceColor property also must be set to 'flat'.

  • 'interp' — Use interpolated transparency for each face based on the values in AlphaData property. First you must specify the AlphaData property as a matrix the same size as the ZData property. The transparency varies across each face by interpolating the values at the vertices. The FaceColor property also must be set to 'interp'.

  • 'texturemap' — Transform the data in AlphaData so that it conforms to the surface.

Effect of light objects on faces, specified as one of these values:

  • 'flat' — Apply light uniformly across the faces. Use this value to view faceted objects.

  • 'gouraud' — Vary the light across the faces. Calculate the light at the vertices and then linearly interpolate the light across the faces. Use this value to view curved surfaces.

  • 'none' — Do not apply light from light objects to the faces.

    Note:   The 'phong' value has been removed. Use 'gouraud' instead.

Face lighting when the vertex normals point away from camera, specified as one of these values:

  • 'reverselit' — Light the face as if the vertex normal pointed towards the camera.

  • 'unlit' — Do not light the face.

  • 'lit' — Light the face according to the vertex normal.

Use this property to discriminate between the internal and external surfaces of an object. For an example, see Back Face Lighting.

Edges

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Edge line color, specified as one of these values:

  • 'none' — Do not draw edges.

  • 'flat' — Draw uniform edge colors. Use the CData value of the first vertex of the face to determine the color for each edge. You cannot use this value when the EdgeAlpha property is set to 'interp'.

  • 'interp' — Interpolate the edge colors. Use a linear interpolation of the CData values at the face vertices to determine the edge color. You cannot use this value when the EdgeAlpha property is set to 'flat'.

  • RGB triplet or character vector of a color name — Use the same color for all edges.

An RGB triplet is a three-element row vector whose elements specify the intensities of the red, green, and blue components of the color. The intensities must be in the range [0,1]; for example, [0.4 0.6 0.7]. This table lists the long and short color name options and the equivalent RGB triplet values.

Long NameShort NameRGB Triplet
'yellow''y'[1 1 0]
'magenta''m'[1 0 1]
'cyan''c'[0 1 1]
'red''r'[1 0 0]
'green''g'[0 1 0]
'blue''b'[0 0 1]
'white''w'[1 1 1]
'black''k'[0 0 0]

Edge transparency, specified as one of these values:

  • Scalar in range [0,1] — Use uniform transparency across all of the edges. A value of 1 is fully opaque and 0 is completely transparent. Values between 0 and 1 are semitransparent. This option does not use the transparency values in the AlphaData property.

  • 'flat' — Use a different transparency for each edge based on the values in the AlphaData property. First you must specify the AlphaData property as a matrix the same size as the ZData property. The transparency value at the first vertex determines the transparency for the entire edge. The EdgeColor property also must be set to 'flat'.

  • 'interp' — Use interpolated transparency for each edge based on the values in AlphaData property. First you must specify the AlphaData property as a matrix the same size as the ZData property. The transparency varies across each edge by interpolating the values at the vertices. The EdgeColor property also must be set to 'interp'.

Effect of light objects on edges, specified as one of these values:

  • 'flat' — Apply light uniformly across the each edges.

  • 'none' — Do not apply lights from light objects to the edges.

  • 'gouraud' — Calculate the light at the vertices, and then linearly interpolate across the edges.

    Note:   The 'phong' value has been removed. Use 'gouraud' instead.

Line style, specified as one of the line styles listed in this table.

Line StyleDescriptionResulting Line
'-'Solid line

'--'Dashed line

':'Dotted line

'-.'Dash-dotted line

'none'No lineNo line

Line width, specified as a positive value in points. If the line has markers, then the line width also affects the marker edges.

Example: 0.75

Sharp vertical and horizontal lines, specified as 'off' or 'on'.

If the associated figure has a GraphicsSmoothing property set to 'on' and a Renderer property set to 'opengl', then the figure applies a smoothing technique to plots. In some cases, this smoothing technique can cause vertical and horizontal lines to appear uneven in thickness or color. Use the AlignVertexCenters property to eliminate the uneven appearance.

  • 'off' — Do not sharpen vertical or horizontal lines. The lines might appear uneven in thickness or color.

  • 'on' — Sharpen vertical and horizontal lines to eliminate an uneven appearance.

    Note:   You must have a graphics card that supports this feature. To see if the feature is supported, type opengl info. If it is supported, then the returned fields contain the line SupportsAlignVertexCenters: 1.

Edges to display, specified as 'both', 'row', or 'column'.

Markers

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Marker symbol, specified as one of the values listed in this table. By default, the primitive surface object does not display markers. Specifying a marker symbol adds markers at each data point or vertex.

ValueDescription
'o'Circle
'+'Plus sign
'*'Asterisk
'.'Point
'x'Cross
'square' or 's'Square
'diamond' or 'd'Diamond
'^'Upward-pointing triangle
'v'Downward-pointing triangle
'>'Right-pointing triangle
'<'Left-pointing triangle
'pentagram' or 'p'Five-pointed star (pentagram)
'hexagram' or 'h'Six-pointed star (hexagram)
'none'No markers

Example: '+'

Example: 'diamond'

Marker size, specified as a positive value in points.

Example: 10

Marker outline color, specified as specified as one of these values:

  • 'auto' — Use the same color as the EdgeColor property.

  • 'none' — Use no color, which makes unfilled markers invisible.

  • 'flat' — Use the CData value at the vertex to set the color.

  • RGB triplet or character vector of a color name — Use the specified color.

An RGB triplet is a three-element row vector whose elements specify the intensities of the red, green, and blue components of the color. The intensities must be in the range [0,1]; for example, [0.4 0.6 0.7]. This table lists the long and short color name options and the equivalent RGB triplet values.

Long NameShort NameRGB Triplet
'yellow''y'[1 1 0]
'magenta''m'[1 0 1]
'cyan''c'[0 1 1]
'red''r'[1 0 0]
'green''g'[0 1 0]
'blue''b'[0 0 1]
'white''w'[1 1 1]
'black''k'[0 0 0]

Example: [0.5 0.5 0.5]

Example: 'blue'

Marker fill color, specified as one of these values:

  • 'none' — Use no color, which allows the background to show through.

  • 'auto' — Use the same color as the Color property for the axes.

  • 'flat' — Use the CData value of the vertex to set the color.

  • RGB triplet or character vector of a color name — Use the specified color.

An RGB triplet is a three-element row vector whose elements specify the intensities of the red, green, and blue components of the color. The intensities must be in the range [0,1]; for example, [0.4 0.6 0.7]. This table lists the long and short color name options and the equivalent RGB triplet values.

Long NameShort NameRGB Triplet
'yellow''y'[1 1 0]
'magenta''m'[1 0 1]
'cyan''c'[0 1 1]
'red''r'[1 0 0]
'green''g'[0 1 0]
'blue''b'[0 0 1]
'white''w'[1 1 1]
'black''k'[0 0 0]

This property affects only the circle, square, diamond, pentagram, hexagram, and the four triangle marker types.

Example: [0.3 0.2 0.1]

Example: 'green'

Example:

Face and Vertex Normals

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Normal vectors for each surface face, specified as a (m-1)-by-(n-1)-by-3 array, where [m,n] = size(ZData). Specify one normal vector per face.

Specifying values for this property sets the associated mode to manual. If you do not specify normal vectors, then the surface generates this data for lighting calculations.

Data Types: single | double

Selection mode for FaceNormals, specified as one of these values:

  • 'auto' — Calculate the normal vectors based on the coordinate data.

  • 'manual' — Use manually specified values. To specify the values, set the FaceNormals property.

Normal vectors for each surface vertex, specified as a m-by-n-by-3 array, where [m,n] = size(ZData). Specify one normal vector per vertex.

Specifying values for this property sets the associated mode to manual. If you do not specify normal vectors, then the surface generates this data for lighting calculations.

Data Types: single | double

Selection mode for VertexNormals, specified as one of these values:

  • 'auto' — Calculate the normal vectors based on the coordinate data.

  • 'manual' — Use manually specified values. To specify the values, set the VertexNormals property.

Color and Transparency Mapping

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Transparency data for each vertex, specified as an array the same size as the ZData property. After specifying the values, set the FaceAlpha and EdegAlpha properties to control the type of transparency. If the FaceAlpha and EdgeAlpha properties are both set to scalar values, then the primitive surface does not use the AlphaData values.

The AlphaDataMapping property determines how the primitive surface interprets the AlphaData property values.

Data Types: single | double | int8 | int16 | int32 | int64 | uint8 | uint16 | uint32 | uint64 | logical

Interpretation of AlphaData values, specified as one of these values:

  • 'none' — Interpret the values as transparency values. A value of 1 or greater is completely opaque, a value of 0 or less is completely transparent, and a value between 0 and 1 is semitransparent.

  • 'scaled' — Map the values into the figure's alphamap. The minimum and maximum alpha limits of the axes determine the AlphaData values that map to the first and last elements in the alphamap, respectively. For example, if the alpha limits are [3 5], then values of 3 or less map to the first element in the alphamap. Values of 5 or greater map to the last element in the alphamap. The ALim property of the axes contains the alpha limits. The Alphamap property of the figure contains the alphamap.

  • 'direct' — Interpret the values as indices into the figure's alphamap. Values with a decimal portion are fixed to the nearest lower integer.

    • If the values are of type double or single, then values of 1 or less map to the first element in the alphamap. Values equal to or greater than the length of the alphamap map to the last element in the alphamap.

    • If the values are of integer type, then values of 0 or less map to the first element in the alphamap. Values equal to or greater than the length of the alphamap map to the last element in the alphamap (or up to the range limits of the type). The integer types are uint8, uint16, uint32, uint64 , int8, int16, int32, and int64.

    • If the values are of type logical, then values of 0 map to the first element in the alphamap and values of 1 map to the second element in the alphamap.

Vertex colors, specified in one of these forms:

  • 2-D array — Use colormap colors. Specify a color for each vertex by setting CData to an array the same size as ZData. The CDataMapping property determines how these values map into the current colormap. If the FaceColor property is set to 'texturemap', then CData does not need to be the same size as ZData. However, it must be of type double or uint8. The CData values map to conform to the surface defined by ZData.

  • 3-D array — Use true colors. Specify an RGB triplet color for each vertex by setting CData to an m-by-n-by-3 array where [m,n] = size(ZData). An RGB triplet is a three-element vector that specifies the intensities of the red, green, and blue components of a color. The first page of the array contains the red components, the second the green components, and the third the blue components of the colors. Since the surface uses true colors instead of colormap colors, the CDataMapping property has no effect.

    • If CData is of type double or single, then an RGB triplet value of [0 0 0] corresponds to black and [1 1 1] corresponds to white.

    • If CData is an integer type, then the surface uses the full range of data to determine the color. For example, if CData is of type uint8, then [0 0 0] corresponds to black and [255 255 255] corresponds to white. If CData is of type int8, then [-128 -128 -128] corresponds to black and [127 127 127] corresponds to white.

Data Types: single | double | int8 | int16 | int32 | int64 | uint8 | uint16 | uint32 | uint64

Direct or scaled colormapping, specified as one of these values:

  • scaled — Transform the color data to span the portion of the colormap indicated by the axes CLim property, linearly mapping data values to colors. See the caxis reference page for more information on this mapping.

  • direct — Use the color data as indices directly into the colormap. The color data should then be integer values ranging from 1 to length(colormap). MATLAB® maps values less than 1 to the first color in the colormap, and values greater than length(colormap) to the last color in the colormap. Values with a decimal portion are fixed to the nearest lower integer.

Selection mode for CData, specified as one of these values:

  • 'auto' — Use the ZData values to set the colors.

  • 'manual' — Use manually specified values. To specify the values, set the CData property.

Lighting

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Strength of ambient light, specified as a scalar value in the range [0,1]. Ambient light is a nondirectional light that illuminates the entire scene. There must be at least one visible light object in the axes for the ambient light to be visible.

The AmbientLightColor property for the axes sets the color of the ambient light. The color is the same for all objects in the axes.

Example: 0.5

Data Types: double

Strength of diffuse light, specified as a scalar value in the range [0,1]. Diffuse light is the nonspecular reflectance from light objects in the axes.

Example: 0.3

Data Types: double

Color of specular reflections, specified as a scalar value in the range [0,1]. A value of 1 sets the color using only the color of the light source. A value of 0 sets the color using both the color of the object from which it reflects and the color of the light source. The Color property of the light contains the color of the light source. The proportions vary linearly for values in between.

Example: 0.5

Data Types: double

Size of specular spot, specified as a scalar value greater than or equal to 1. Most materials have exponents in the range [5 20].

Example: 7

Data Types: double

Strength of specular reflection, specified as a scalar value in the range [0,1]. Specular reflections are the bright spots on the surface from light objects in the axes.

Example: 0.3

Data Types: double

Data

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x-coordinate data specified as a matrix that is the same size as ZData or a vector of length(n), where [m,n] = size(ZData).

Data Types: single | double | int8 | int16 | int32 | int64 | uint8 | uint16 | uint32 | uint64 | datetime | duration

y-coordinate data specified as a matrix that is the same size as ZData or a vector of length(m), where [m,n] = size(ZData).

Example:

Data Types: single | double | int8 | int16 | int32 | int64 | uint8 | uint16 | uint32 | uint64 | datetime | duration

z-coordinate data specified as a matrix.

Data Types: single | double | int8 | int16 | int32 | int64 | uint8 | uint16 | uint32 | uint64 | datetime | duration

Selection mode for XData, specified as one of these values:

  • 'auto' — Use the column indices of ZData.

  • 'manual' — Use manually specified value. To specify the value, pass an input argument to the plotting function or directly set the XData property.

Selection mode for YData, specified as one of these values:

  • 'auto' — Use the row indices of ZData.

  • 'manual' — Use manually specified value. To specify the value, pass an input argument to the plotting function or directly set the YData property.

Visibility

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State of visibility, specified as one of these values:

  • 'on' — Display the primitive surface.

  • 'off' — Hide the primitive surface without deleting it. You still can access the properties of an invisible primitive surface object.

Clipping of the primitive surface object to the axes limits, specified as one of these values:

  • 'on' — Do not display parts of the primitive surface object that are outside the axes limits.

  • 'off' — Display the entire primitive surface object, even if parts of it appear outside the axes limits. Parts of the primitive surface object might appear outside the axes limits if you create a plot, set hold on, freeze the axis scaling, and then create the primitive surface object so that it is larger than the original plot.

The Clipping property of the axes that contains the primitive surface object must be set to 'on', otherwise this property has no effect. For more information about the clipping behavior, see the Clipping property of the axes.

    Note:   EraseMode has been removed. You can delete code that accesses the EraseMode property with minimal impact. If you were using EraseMode to create line animations, use the animatedline function instead.

Technique to draw and erase objects, specified as one of these values:

  • 'normal' — Redraw the affected region of the display, performing the three-dimensional analysis necessary to correctly render all objects. This mode produces the most accurate picture, but is the slowest. The other modes are faster, but do not perform a complete redraw and, therefore, are less accurate.

  • 'none' — Do not erase the object when it is moved or destroyed. After you erase the object with EraseMode,'none', it is still visible on the screen. However, you cannot print the object because MATLAB does not store any information on its former location.

  • 'xor' — Draw and erase the object by performing an exclusive OR (XOR) with the color of the screen beneath it. This mode does not damage the color of the objects beneath it. However, the object color depends on the color of whatever is beneath it on the display.

  • 'background' — Erase the object by redrawing it in the axes background color, or the figure background color if the axes Color property is 'none'. This damages objects that are behind the erased object, but properly colors the erased object.

MATLAB always prints figures as if the EraseMode property of all objects is set to 'normal'. This means graphics objects created with EraseMode set to 'none', 'xor', or 'background' can look different on screen than on paper. On screen, MATLAB mathematically combines layers of colors and ignores three-dimensional sorting to obtain greater rendering speed. However, MATLAB does not apply these techniques to the printed output. Use the getframe command or other screen capture applications to create an image of a figure containing nonnormal mode objects.

Identifiers

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User-specified tag to associate with the primitive surface, specified as a character vector. Tags provide a way to identify graphics objects. Use this property to find all objects with a specific tag within a plotting hierarchy, for example, searching for the tag using findobj.

Example: 'January Data'

This property is read only.

Type of graphics object, returned as 'surface'

Data to associate with the primitive surface object, specified as any MATLAB data, for example, a scalar, vector, matrix, cell array, character array, table, or structure. MATLAB does not use this data.

To associate multiple sets of data or to attach a field name to the data, use the getappdata and setappdata functions.

Example: 1:100

Text used for the legend label, specified as a character vector. If you do not specify the text, then the legend uses a label of the form 'dataN'. The legend does not display until you call the legend command.

Example: 'Label Text'

This property is read only.

Control for including or excluding the primitive surface from a legend, returned as an Annotation object. Set the underlying IconDisplayStyle property to one of these values:

  • 'on' — Include the primitive surface in the legend (default).

  • 'off' — Do not include the primitive surface in the legend.

For example, exclude a stem chart from the legend.

p = plot(1:10,'DisplayName','Line Chart');
hold on
s = stem(1:10,'DisplayName','Stem Chart');
hold off
s.Annotation.LegendInformation.IconDisplayStyle = 'off';
legend('show')

Alternatively, you can control the items in a legend using the legend function. Specify the first input argument as a vector of the graphics objects to include.

p = plot(1:10,'DisplayName','Line Chart');
hold on
s = stem(1:10,'DisplayName','Stem Chart');
hold off
legend(p)

Parent/Child

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Parent of primitive surface, specified as an axes, group, or transform object.

Visibility of primitive surface object handle in the Children property of the parent, specified as one of these values:

  • 'on' — The primitive surface object handle is always visible.

  • 'off' — The primitive surface object handle is invisible at all times. This option is useful for preventing unintended changes to the UI by another function. Set the HandleVisibility to 'off' to temporarily hide the handle during the execution of that function.

  • 'callback' — The primitive surface object handle is visible from within callbacks or functions invoked by callbacks, but not from within functions invoked from the command line. This option blocks access to the primitive surface at the command-line, but allows callback functions to access it.

If the primitive surface object is not listed in the Children property of the parent, then functions that obtain object handles by searching the object hierarchy or querying handle properties cannot return it. This includes get, findobj, gca, gcf, gco, newplot, cla, clf, and close.

Hidden object handles are still valid. Set the root ShowHiddenHandles property to 'on' to list all object handles regardless of their HandleVisibility property setting.

The primitive surface has no children. You cannot set this property.

Interactive Control

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Mouse-click callback, specified as one of these values:

  • Function handle

  • Cell array containing a function handle and additional arguments

  • Character vector that is a valid MATLAB command or function, which is evaluated in the base workspace (not recommended)

Use this property to execute code when you click the primitive surface. If you specify this property using a function handle, then MATLAB passes two arguments to the callback function when executing the callback:

  • The primitive surface object — You can access properties of the primitive surface object from within the callback function.

  • Event data — This argument is empty for this property. Replace it with the tilde character (~) in the function definition to indicate that this argument is not used.

For more information on how to use function handles to define callback functions, see Callback Definition.

    Note:   If the PickableParts property is set to 'none' or if the HitTest property is set to 'off', then this callback does not execute.

Example: @myCallback

Example: {@myCallback,arg3}

Context menu, specified as a uicontextmenu object. Use this property to display a context menu when you right-click the primitive surface. Create the context menu using the uicontextmenu function.

    Note:   If the PickableParts property is set to 'none' or if the HitTest property is set to 'off', then the context menu does not appear.

Selection state, specified as one of these values:

  • 'on' — Selected. If you click the primitive surface when in plot edit mode, then MATLAB sets its Selected property to 'on'. If the SelectionHighlight property also is set to 'on', then MATLAB displays selection handles around the primitive surface.

  • 'off' — Not selected.

Display of selection handles when selected, specified as one of these values:

  • 'on' — Display selection handles when the Selected property is set to 'on'.

  • 'off' — Never display selection handles, even when the Selected property is set to 'on'.

Callback Execution Control

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Ability to capture mouse clicks, specified as one of these values:

  • 'visible' — Can capture mouse clicks when visible. The Visible property must be set to 'on' and you must click a part of the primitive surface that has a defined color. You cannot click a part that has an associated color property set to 'none'. If the plot contains markers, then the entire marker is clickable if either the edge or the fill has a defined color. The HitTest property determines if the primitive surface responds to the click or if an ancestor does.

  • 'all' — Can capture mouse clicks regardless of visibility. The Visible property can be set to 'on' or 'off' and you can click a part of the primitive surface that has no color. The HitTest property determines if the primitive surface responds to the click or if an ancestor does.

  • 'none' — Cannot capture mouse clicks. Clicking the primitive surface passes the click through it to the object below it in the current view of the figure window. The HitTest property has no effect.

Response to captured mouse clicks, specified as one of these values:

  • 'on' — Trigger the ButtonDownFcn callback of the primitive surface. If you have defined the UIContextMenu property, then invoke the context menu.

  • 'off' — Trigger the callbacks for the nearest ancestor of the primitive surface that has a HitTest property set to 'on' and a PickableParts property value that enables the ancestor to capture mouse clicks.

    Note:   The PickableParts property determines if the primitive surface object can capture mouse clicks. If it cannot, then the HitTest property has no effect.

Callback queuing specified as 'queue' or 'cancel'. The BusyAction property determines how MATLAB handles the execution of interrupting callbacks.

    Note:   There are two callback states to consider:

    • The running callback is the currently executing callback.

    • The interrupting callback is a callback that tries to interrupt the running callback.

    Whenever MATLAB invokes a callback, that callback attempts to interrupt a running callback. The Interruptible property of the object owning the running callback determines if interruption is allowed. If interruption is not allowed, then the BusyAction property of the object owning the interrupting callback determines if it is discarded or put in the queue.

If the ButtonDownFcn callback of the primitive surface tries to interrupt a running callback that cannot be interrupted, then the BusyAction property determines if it is discarded or put in the queue. Specify the BusyAction property as one of these values:

  • 'queue' — Put the interrupting callback in a queue to be processed after the running callback finishes execution. This is the default behavior.

  • 'cancel' — Discard the interrupting callback.

Callback interruption, specified as 'on' or 'off'. The Interruptible property determines if a running callback can be interrupted.

    Note:   There are two callback states to consider:

    • The running callback is the currently executing callback.

    • The interrupting callback is a callback that tries to interrupt the running callback.

    Whenever MATLAB invokes a callback, that callback attempts to interrupt a running callback. The Interruptible property of the object owning the running callback determines if interruption is allowed. If interruption is not allowed, then the BusyAction property of the object owning the interrupting callback determines if it is discarded or put in the queue.

If the ButtonDownFcn callback of the primitive surface is the running callback, then the Interruptible property determines if it another callback can interrupt it:

  • 'on' — Interruptible. Interruption occurs at the next point where MATLAB processes the queue, such as when there is a drawnow, figure, getframe, waitfor, or pause command.

    • If the running callback contains one of these commands, then MATLAB stops the execution of the callback at this point and executes the interrupting callback. MATLAB resumes executing the running callback when the interrupting callback completes. For more information, see Interrupt Callback Execution.

    • If the running callback does not contain one of these commands, then MATLAB finishes executing the callback without interruption.

  • 'off' — Not interruptible. MATLAB finishes executing the running callback without any interruptions.

Creation and Deletion Control

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Creation callback, specified as one of these values:

  • Function handle

  • Cell array containing a function handle and additional arguments

  • Character vector that is a valid MATLAB command or function, which is evaluated in the base workspace (not recommended)

Use this property to execute code when you create the primitive surface. Setting the CreateFcn property on an existing primitive surface has no effect. You must define a default value for this property, or define this property using a Name,Value pair during primitive surface creation. MATLAB executes the callback after creating the primitive surface and setting all of its properties.

If you specify this callback using a function handle, then MATLAB passes two arguments to the callback function when executing the callback:

  • The primitive surface object — You can access properties of the primitive surface object from within the callback function. You also can access the primitive surface object through the CallbackObject property of the root, which can be queried using the gcbo function.

  • Event data — This argument is empty for this property. Replace it with the tilde character (~) in the function definition to indicate that this argument is not used.

For more information on how to use function handles to define callback functions, see Callback Definition.

Example: @myCallback

Example: {@myCallback,arg3}

Deletion callback, specified as one of these values:

  • Function handle

  • Cell array containing a function handle and additional arguments

  • Character vector that is a valid MATLAB command or function, which is evaluated in the base workspace (not recommended)

Use this property to execute code when you delete the primitive surface. MATLAB executes the callback before destroying the primitive surface so that the callback can access its property values.

If you specify this callback using a function handle, then MATLAB passes two arguments to the callback function when executing the callback:

  • The primitive surface object — You can access properties of the primitive surface object from within the callback function. You also can access the primitive surface object through the CallbackObject property of the root, which can be queried using the gcbo function.

  • Event data — This argument is empty for this property. Replace it with the tilde character (~) in the function definition to indicate that this argument is not used.

For more information on how to use function handles to define callback functions, see Callback Definition.

Example: @myCallback

Example: {@myCallback,arg3}

This property is read only.

Deletion status of primitive surface, returned as 'off' or 'on'. MATLAB sets the BeingDeleted property to 'on' when the delete function of the primitive surface begins execution (see the DeleteFcn property). The BeingDeleted property remains set to 'on' until the primitive surface no longer exists.

Check the value of the BeingDeleted property to verify that the primitive surface is not about to be deleted before querying or modifying it.

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