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Please hepl my identify the appropriate matlab plugin - Combine Two or more images

Asked by Mark
on 22 May 2012


I have recently acquired numerous images from a microscope. In order to use the information there, I have to use some of the images to create a much larger image. Because of the nature of the specimen I placed on the microscope, the 'larger image' won't necessarily be a perfect rectangle or square; it might be T-shaped or L-shaped, have some other irregular shape. In other words the areas where each individual image overlap aren't regularly distributed.

Is there a matlab plugin that allows the user to open each of the images for a given sample, manually overlap them, and then create a final image from the result? Does it work with 16-bit images?

Thank you,


  1 Comment

on 22 May 2012

I would intuitively suggest that if you want to use MatLab for this, then you will be developing (or adapting/using) some automatic image matching techniques. The Image Processing Toolbox would be useful here. If you want manual control, then have a look around the internet for free image stitching software. It might possibly get you to your goal a bit faster.


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2 Answers

Answer by Mark
on 22 May 2012
 Accepted answer

Thank you for your help everyone. I found a plug-in for a free microscopy software package that will let me do what I want to do. Apparently, I also need to learn how to use spell check, since I spelled 'help' as 'hepl' in the subject line for this post.

Thank you!



Answer by Image Analyst
on 22 May 2012

You could use imtransform() in the Image Processing Toolbox. There is not a built in application to build up a larger image by placing smaller, distorted images on a larger canvass and then dewarping them. You'd have to build that yourself or hire a consultant to write it for you, or else use Photoshop or similar photo-editing software.


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