Cody

Jan Orwat

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Jan Orwat submitted a Comment to Solution 1102049

Your output y is a row vector (or scalar), but in 3'rd test it should be a column vector. Predefine y first with the same size as x.

on 13 Jan 2017 at 8:16

Jan Orwat submitted Solution 1100508 to Problem 43991. if

on 9 Jan 2017 at 10:46

Jan Orwat submitted Solution 1100506 to Problem 43993. Quantization Level

on 9 Jan 2017 at 10:45

Jan Orwat received Strings I Master badge

on 13 Dec 2016

Jan Orwat received Indexing II Master badge

on 18 Nov 2016

Jan Orwat submitted a Comment to Solution 1050679

You don't need integrator1, then change Gain

on 11 Nov 2016

Jan Orwat liked Solution 1044314

on 9 Nov 2016

Jan Orwat submitted a Comment to Solution 1047166

Thus it is not a 4-parasitic number. It doesn't meet the definition. Nevertheless is a great example of a cyclic number. You can get different cyclic permutations when multiply 142857 by 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. For 5 you got shift by one digit, therefore it's 5-parasitic.

on 8 Nov 2016

Jan Orwat submitted a Comment to Solution 1047978

This solution shows a little bit different approach to the problem. It leads to nice, short code.

on 8 Nov 2016

Jan Orwat received Indexing I Master badge

on 8 Nov 2016

Jan Orwat submitted a Comment to Solution 1047166

There is 4, not 5

on 8 Nov 2016

Jan Orwat submitted a Comment to Problem 1771. Polygonal numbers

Explain why. It makes a lot of sense to me, and it's a lot easier (and makes even more educational sense) with 2016b. Just learn the difference between * and .* and ask yourself you need 1st or 2nd.

on 15 Oct 2016

Jan Orwat submitted a Comment to Problem 2737. Prouhet–Tarry–Escott (basic)

I have no idea what I was thinking of when I wrote this. Thanks for pointing that out so quickly.

on 8 Oct 2016

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