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Orlando Rodríguez

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Professional Interests:
Ray tracing, oceanography, wave propagation

 

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Files Posted by Orlando View all
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19 Dec 2013 Screenshot Gegenpol Gegenbauer (ultraspherical) orthogonal polynomial Author: Orlando Rodríguez orthogonal polynomial... 6 0
19 Dec 2013 Screenshot Laguepol Laguerre polynomial for order n and argument X. Author: Orlando Rodríguez orthogonal polynomial... 10 0
19 Dec 2013 Screenshot Jacobpol Jacobi polynomial for order n and argument X. Author: Orlando Rodríguez orthogonal polynomial... 9 0
19 Dec 2013 Screenshot Hermipol Hermite polynomial H of ordder n and argument X Author: Orlando Rodríguez orthogonal polynomial... 16 0
18 Dec 2013 Screenshot Legenpol Legendre polynomial Author: Orlando Rodríguez orthogonal polynomial... 11 0
Comments and Ratings by Orlando View all
Updated File Comments Rating
26 Feb 2014 geodistance Calculates the distance on the surface of the earth. Author: Orlando Rodríguez

Hi Mike, thanks for the comment (I need to check my submissions more often). It seems to me that the coordinates are being given in the wrong order. Let's see, this is Haversine:
R = 6371*1e3;
p1 = [45.5428,-73.6434];
p2 = [45.6813,-74.0250];
lat1 = p1(1); lon1 = p1(2); lat1 = lat1*pi/180; lon1 = lon1*pi/180;
lat2 = p2(1); lon2 = p2(2); lat2 = lat2*pi/180; lon2 = lon2*pi/180;
dLat = (lat2-lat1);
dLon = (lon2-lon1);
lat1 = lat1;
lat2 = lat2;
a = sin(dLat/2) * sin(dLat/2) + ...
sin(dLon/2) * sin(dLon/2) * cos(lat1) * cos(lat2);
c = 2 * atan2(sqrt(a), sqrt(1-a));
d = R * c
You get 3.3439e+04.
Now, if you do:
lat1 = p1(2); lon1 = p1(1); lat1 = lat1*pi/180; lon1 = lon1*pi/180;
lat2 = p2(2); lon2 = p2(1); lat2 = lat2*pi/180; lon2 = lon2*pi/180;
(bla bla bla...)
you get 4.2648e+04
Now, with geodistance([45.5428,-73.6434],[45.6813,-74.0250],6)
you get 4.2806e+04,
but with
geodistance([-73.6434,45.5428],[-74.0250,45.6813],6)
you get 3.3511e+04.
I will dare to say that geodistance can be expected to exhibit a decent accuracy because it allows the user to choose a local geoid. Unfortunately, I don't have data to substantiate this claim, so you will have to trust the code.

28 Nov 2013 Sea surface Stochastic generation of the sea surface given wind speed and wind direction. Author: Orlando Rodríguez

No you are not. The derivative is fine.

01 Feb 2012 Scan2data Convert image to curve even with a grid. Author: Gregory Laduree

Wow, great! I was looking for a tool like this for a long time. Thanks Gregory!

01 Nov 2011 Sea surface Stochastic generation of the sea surface given wind speed and wind direction. Author: Orlando Rodríguez

Dear Yoon-soo Jang:
왜 먼저 Matlab을 배울하지?

09 Feb 2011 utm2deg Function to convert vectors of UTM coordinates into Lat/Lon vectors (WGS84) Author: Rafael Palacios

Nice contribution. Thanks Rafael!

Comments and Ratings on Orlando's Files View all
Updated File Comment by Comments Rating
26 Feb 2014 geodistance Calculates the distance on the surface of the earth. Author: Orlando Rodríguez Rodríguez, Orlando

Hi Mike, thanks for the comment (I need to check my submissions more often). It seems to me that the coordinates are being given in the wrong order. Let's see, this is Haversine:
R = 6371*1e3;
p1 = [45.5428,-73.6434];
p2 = [45.6813,-74.0250];
lat1 = p1(1); lon1 = p1(2); lat1 = lat1*pi/180; lon1 = lon1*pi/180;
lat2 = p2(1); lon2 = p2(2); lat2 = lat2*pi/180; lon2 = lon2*pi/180;
dLat = (lat2-lat1);
dLon = (lon2-lon1);
lat1 = lat1;
lat2 = lat2;
a = sin(dLat/2) * sin(dLat/2) + ...
sin(dLon/2) * sin(dLon/2) * cos(lat1) * cos(lat2);
c = 2 * atan2(sqrt(a), sqrt(1-a));
d = R * c
You get 3.3439e+04.
Now, if you do:
lat1 = p1(2); lon1 = p1(1); lat1 = lat1*pi/180; lon1 = lon1*pi/180;
lat2 = p2(2); lon2 = p2(1); lat2 = lat2*pi/180; lon2 = lon2*pi/180;
(bla bla bla...)
you get 4.2648e+04
Now, with geodistance([45.5428,-73.6434],[45.6813,-74.0250],6)
you get 4.2806e+04,
but with
geodistance([-73.6434,45.5428],[-74.0250,45.6813],6)
you get 3.3511e+04.
I will dare to say that geodistance can be expected to exhibit a decent accuracy because it allows the user to choose a local geoid. Unfortunately, I don't have data to substantiate this claim, so you will have to trust the code.

28 Nov 2013 Sea surface Stochastic generation of the sea surface given wind speed and wind direction. Author: Orlando Rodríguez Rodríguez, Orlando

No you are not. The derivative is fine.

18 Nov 2013 Sea surface Stochastic generation of the sea surface given wind speed and wind direction. Author: Orlando Rodríguez hasan, has

Thanks... I guess there is a missing term in the line (dFdK = sqrt( g./K )/( 4*pi );). I think it will be dFdK = sqrt( g./K )./( 4*pi*K );.
Since F(k) = E(f,theta)/(k.(dk/df)) at ocean waves tutorial. k in this equation is missing. Please check it. Am I right?

03 Oct 2013 Sea surface Stochastic generation of the sea surface given wind speed and wind direction. Author: Orlando Rodríguez rahman

tnx for your useful code.in mitsuyasu and hasselmann spreading function code,what does the line D = D + fliplr( flipud( D ) ) do? why did you write these lines?

21 Feb 2013 geodistance Calculates the distance on the surface of the earth. Author: Orlando Rodríguez Mike

Hi Orlando. What kind of precision can we expect using geodistance? I tried:
geodistance([45.5428,-73.6434],[45.6813,-74.0250],6)

ans =

4.2806e+04

However with the same coordinates, GoogleMaps gave me 33480m. Giving the huge difference, I looked for another method. I found the Haversine formula. Haversine gave me 33439m, which seems to agree more with GoogleMaps.
Is geodistance more accurate than the other two? I'd like to know 'cause I might have been ripped off for some time filling my expense report using GoogleMaps!!

Thank you,

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