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From: dbd <dbd@ieee.org>
Newsgroups: comp.soft-sys.matlab
Subject: Re: Time shift and FFT
Date: Mon, 24 May 2010 16:46:23 -0700 (PDT)
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On May 24, 3:22 pm, "omegayen " <omega...@ameritech.net> wrote:
> dbd <d...@ieee.org> wrote in message <f080661f-69fd-447b-9610-681edac15...@q39g2000prh.googlegroups.com>...
> > On May 24, 12:36 pm, "omegayen " <omega...@ameritech.net> wrote:
>
> > [quoted code removed]

> I was just extending the original example.
>
> My new example made the signal in the time domain complex and I was merely trying to prove or disprove to myself that the Fourier Transform is only defined for real signals and not complex signals.
>
> Does this make sense?
>
> Essentially I was asking the question, can you take the Fourier transform of a complex signal which is in the time domain?

So what was your conclusion?

Did you try 0:94 for n and k? What was your conclusion?

Dale B. Dalrymple