Path: news.mathworks.com!not-for-mail
From: <HIDDEN>
Newsgroups: comp.soft-sys.matlab
Subject: Re: Vector Calculus
Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2011 20:09:05 +0000 (UTC)
Organization: The MathWorks, Inc.
Lines: 11
Message-ID: <innq11$bf0$1@fred.mathworks.com>
References: <inngjk$plu$1@fred.mathworks.com>
Reply-To: <HIDDEN>
NNTP-Posting-Host: www-06-blr.mathworks.com
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit
X-Trace: fred.mathworks.com 1302293345 11744 172.30.248.38 (8 Apr 2011 20:09:05 GMT)
X-Complaints-To: news@mathworks.com
NNTP-Posting-Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2011 20:09:05 +0000 (UTC)
X-Newsreader: MATLAB Central Newsreader 1187260
Xref: news.mathworks.com comp.soft-sys.matlab:720917

"wesley " <wes.wortman@gmail.com> wrote in message <inngjk$plu$1@fred.mathworks.com>...
>......
> Problem: Evaluate int int sub s ( curl F). n dA directly for the given F and S.
> F=[y^3, -x^3,0]  S=: X^2+y^2 <= 1 z=0 
> Maybe supposed to use Stokes Theorem or formula. 
> Can I automate any of this with matlab?
> .......
- - - - - - - - - -
  You can use Stoke's Theorem or doubly integrate directly over the circular region.  Both ways lead to simple integration.  (In either case it is best to switch to polar coordinates.)  As for using Matlab there is always the Symbolic Toolbox to find integrals and derivatives and there is a curl function for numerical computation, but frankly this problem is so simple that it is hardly worth bothering about using Matlab.  I did it on a small piece of scratch paper both ways (and got the same answer, too.)

Roger Stafford