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Thread Subject:
Are java built-ins faster than MATLAB?

Subject: Are java built-ins faster than MATLAB?

From: Scott

Date: 19 Jul, 2007 17:49:22

Message: 1 of 5

Many MATLAB built-in functions have an accompanying .ja file. In some cases there are both a .m file with code (not just instructions) and a .ja file. I assume the java code is equivalent to the MATLAB code, but is performed instead of the MATLAB code when available. I also assume that the java is faster. Are these assumptions all true?

Scott

Subject: Are java built-ins faster than MATLAB?

From: Yair Altman

Date: 19 Jul, 2007 20:56:00

Message: 2 of 5

"Scott " <millers@yoyodyne.com> wrote in message <f7o871$h5n$1@fred.mathworks.com>...
> Many MATLAB built-in functions have an accompanying .ja file. In some cases there are both a .m file with code (not just instructions) and a .ja file. I assume the java code is equivalent to the MATLAB code, but is performed instead of the MATLAB code when available. I also assume that the java is faster. Are these assumptions all true?
>
> Scott


I believe .ja files are simply Japanese versions, not Java versions. Matlab should generally be as fast as Java, since the Matlab interpreter is Java based and JIT-optimized. Some built-in Matlab functions are coded in c/c++ and are much faster than their Java or Matlabese counterparts.

Yair Altman
http://www.ymasoftware.com

Subject: Are java built-ins faster than MATLAB?

From: Scott

Date: 19 Jul, 2007 22:11:38

Message: 3 of 5

"Yair Altman" <altmanyDEL@gmailDEL.comDEL> wrote in message <f7oj50$fb7$1@fred.mathworks.com>...
> "Scott " <millers@yoyodyne.com> wrote in message <f7o871$h5n$1@fred.mathworks.com>...
> > Many MATLAB built-in functions have an accompanying .ja file. In some cases there are both a .m file with code (not just instructions) and a .ja file. I assume the java code is equivalent to the MATLAB code, but is performed instead of the MATLAB code when available. I also assume that the java is faster. Are these assumptions all true?
> >
> > Scott
>
>
> I believe .ja files are simply Japanese versions, not Java versions. Matlab should generally be as fast as Java, since the Matlab interpreter is Java based and JIT-optimized. Some built-in Matlab functions are coded in c/c++ and are much faster than their Java or Matlabese counterparts.
>
> Yair Altman
> http://www.ymasoftware.com
>

The possibility that these were Japanese never occured to me, but it seems plausible. Thanks for your response!

Scott

Subject: Are java built-ins faster than MATLAB?

From: Steve Eddins

Date: 19 Jul, 2007 21:57:33

Message: 4 of 5

Yair Altman wrote:
> "Scott " <millers@yoyodyne.com> wrote in message
> <f7o871$h5n$1@fred.mathworks.com>...
>> Many MATLAB built-in functions have an accompanying .ja file. In
>> some cases there are both a .m file with code (not just
>> instructions) and a .ja file. I assume the java code is equivalent
>> to the MATLAB code, but is performed instead of the MATLAB code
>> when available. I also assume that the java is faster. Are these
>> assumptions all true?
>>
>> Scott
>
>
> I believe .ja files are simply Japanese versions, not Java versions.
> Matlab should generally be as fast as Java, since the Matlab
> interpreter is Java based and JIT-optimized. Some built-in Matlab
> functions are coded in c/c++ and are much faster than their Java or
> Matlabese counterparts.
>
> Yair Altman http://www.ymasoftware.com
>

The MATLAB interpreter isn't Java-based.

--
Steve Eddins
http://blogs.mathworks.com/steve

Subject: Are java built-ins faster than MATLAB?

From: Giacomo Veneri

Date: 16 Feb, 2011 08:50:04

Message: 5 of 5

I'm a java programmer: java embedded on matlab code is NOT faster.

If you have to build a fast code try matlab profiler or C/C++ conversion. Alternatively you can develop a more compact java library in order to reduce matlab-jav cross function call.

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