Discover MakerZone

MATLAB and Simulink resources for Arduino, LEGO, and Raspberry Pi

Learn more

Discover what MATLAB® can do for your career.

Opportunities for recent engineering grads.

Apply Today

Thread Subject:
3d curvature plot

Subject: 3d curvature plot

From: fas

Date: 21 Jan, 2009 06:56:00

Message: 1 of 2

I want to plot a 3d curvature, where I provide a angle of curvature
(how curve it should be ) and at what angle should it be in xyz
plane.
I have written this
x = linspace(-1,1,60); y=linspace(-1,1,50);
angle=(40)*(pi/180);
xn=x*angle;yn=y*angle;
[xIndex, yIndex] = meshgrid(xn, yn);
v = sqrt(xIndex.^2 + yIndex.^2);
g_angle=v(1:50,1:60);

But it is symmetric centered around zero. I do not know how to change
the curvature and direction.

Subject: 3d curvature plot

From: Roger Stafford

Date: 22 Jan, 2009 17:35:03

Message: 2 of 2

fas <faisalmufti@gmail.com> wrote in message <7ffd69af-25b6-4b5f-9409-cea774596f9b@a12g2000pro.googlegroups.com>...
> I want to plot a 3d curvature, where I provide a angle of curvature
> (how curve it should be ) and at what angle should it be in xyz
> plane.
> I have written this
> x = linspace(-1,1,60); y=linspace(-1,1,50);
> angle=(40)*(pi/180);
> xn=x*angle;yn=y*angle;
> [xIndex, yIndex] = meshgrid(xn, yn);
> v = sqrt(xIndex.^2 + yIndex.^2);
> g_angle=v(1:50,1:60);
>
> But it is symmetric centered around zero. I do not know how to change
> the curvature and direction.

  I don't understand what you are trying to do here, Fas. You have constructed a mesh of two angular values in radians, and then you have computed a mesh of the square roots of the sums of their squares which you call 'g_angle'. What significance is there in that? I don't know of any natural situation where one angle is the square root of the sum of the squares of two other angles. And I certainly don't understand its connection with the concept of curvature.

  Also I don't know what you mean by an "angle of curvature". Curvature, yes, but angle of curvature, no. Curvature is the rate of change of angle with respect to arclength.

  What do you mean by the "xyz plane". The x, y, z coordinates define a three-dimensional vector space, not a plane which is two-dimensional.

  I would suggest you attempt to restate your problem in much more precise terms so we can understand you.

Roger Stafford

Tags for this Thread

No tags are associated with this thread.

What are tags?

A tag is like a keyword or category label associated with each thread. Tags make it easier for you to find threads of interest.

Anyone can tag a thread. Tags are public and visible to everyone.

Contact us