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Thread Subject:
Where to find Matlab 6 to download

Subject: Where to find Matlab 6 to download

From: bhander4u@aol.com (Bhander4u)

Date: 6 Jul, 2001 08:22:51

Message: 1 of 9

Does anyone know where I would be able to download Matlab 6 or 5 for free on
the net.

Subject: Where to find Matlab 6 to download

From: John D'Errico

Date: 6 Jul, 2001 08:37:21

Message: 2 of 9

In article <20010706042251.26178.00000319@ng-de1.aol.com>,
bhander4u@aol.com (Bhander4u) wrote:

> Does anyone know where I would be able to download Matlab 6 or 5 for free
> on
> the net

Why bother with Matlab 6? Matlab 7 is already written and
available. Its available in the digits of pi (in binary
form.) All you need to know is where to start looking.
For that information, the mathworks will charge you a
nominal fee of course. I wonder when they will start
working on Matlab 8. ;-)

HTH,
John

--

Subject: Where to find Matlab 6 to download

From: roger.elliexyzzy@mindspring.com.invalid (Roger Stafford)

Date: 6 Jul, 2001 12:55:21

Message: 3 of 9

In article <derrico-6D2CDE.08372106072001@news.newsguy.com>, John D'Errico
<derrico@flare.net> wrote:

> In article <20010706042251.26178.00000319@ng-de1.aol.com>,
> bhander4u@aol.com (Bhander4u) wrote:
>
> > Does anyone know where I would be able to download Matlab 6 or 5 for free
> > on
> > the net
>
> Why bother with Matlab 6? Matlab 7 is already written and
> available. Its available in the digits of pi (in binary
> form.) All you need to know is where to start looking.
>
> John
-----
  John, it sounds as though you have been reading Carl Sagan's "Contact".
It's a good story.
--
(Remove "xyzzy" and ".invalid" to send me email.)
Roger Stafford

Subject: Where to find Matlab 6 to download

From: John D'Errico

Date: 6 Jul, 2001 22:00:20

Message: 4 of 9

In article
<roger.elliexyzzy-0607011255220001@user-2initcs.dialup.mindspring.com>,
roger.elliexyzzy@mindspring.com.invalid (Roger Stafford) wrote:

> > Why bother with Matlab 6? Matlab 7 is already written and
> > available. Its available in the digits of pi (in binary
> > form.) All you need to know is where to start looking.
> >
> > John
> -----
> John, it sounds as though you have been reading Carl Sagan's "Contact".
>
> It's a good story.

Yes, I enjoyed Contact. I also preferred the book to the
movie. Jodie Foster is better looking than Carl Sagan
though. ;-)

I'm thinking now, if the code for Matlab n is in the digits
of pi, and we just have to look for it, then there are also
probably sequences where the entire code is there, except
for an error in one bit. Now, how do I know if I've found
the code with the error in it, or the correct version?

My god, think about the testing requirements. Aha! Now I
have the solution. There must be also a version which
includes an error correcting code. All I need to do is
find that version.

John

--

Subject: Where to find Matlab 6 to download

From: winstonsmith1984@hotmail.com (Tim Wright)

Date: 7 Jul, 2001 16:08:15

Message: 5 of 9

John D'Errico <derrico@flare.net> wrote in message news:<derrico-6D2CDE.08372106072001@news.newsguy.com>...
> Why bother with Matlab 6? Matlab 7 is already written and
> available. Its available in the digits of pi (in binary
> form.) All you need to know is where to start looking.
> For that information, the mathworks will charge you a
> nominal fee of course. I wonder when they will start
> working on Matlab 8. ;-)

Is that true though? If pi were an infinitely long random sequence of
digits, I would agree. But while pi isn't exactly orderly (it has
been proven irrational) it isn't simply random and therefore could be
lacking in some sequence of digits, for instance 0100101. Or am I
thinking incorrectely and the digits of pi must in fact include every
possible sequence?

Tim

Subject: Where to find Matlab 6 to download

From: roger.elliexyzzy@mindspring.com.invalid (Roger Stafford)

Date: 7 Jul, 2001 23:43:37

Message: 6 of 9

In article <d22de2a2.0107071508.50a064e5@posting.google.com>,
winstonsmith1984@hotmail.com (Tim Wright) wrote:

> John D'Errico <derrico@flare.net> wrote in message
news:<derrico-6D2CDE.08372106072001@news.newsguy.com>...
> > Why bother with Matlab 6? Matlab 7 is already written and
> > available. Its available in the digits of pi (in binary
> > form.) All you need to know is where to start looking.
>
> Is that true though? If pi were an infinitely long random sequence of
> digits, I would agree. But while pi isn't exactly orderly (it has
> been proven irrational) it isn't simply random and therefore could be
> lacking in some sequence of digits, for instance 0100101. Or am I
> thinking incorrectely and the digits of pi must in fact include every
> possible sequence?
>
> Tim

  Tim, you have posed a challenging question. Certainly irrationality by
itself doesn't imply that the binary expansion of a number will
necessarily have every possible finite subsequence of 1's and 0's in it.
Insert a 1 between every pair of successive digits in the binary expansion
of pi and the result must still be irrational, for otherwise its digits,
including those of the original pi, would have to either stop or start
repeating somewhere, which is clearly impossible since pi itself is
irrational. Yet there are lots of subsequences this new irrational
doesn't possess, for example, 00.

  On the other hand my mathematical intuition strongly agrees with Carl
Sagan's and John D'Errico's that such irrational numbers are surely very
rare entities among the class of all irrationals, and it is most unlikely
that pi would be among them. If we searched long enough in pi we would
almost certainly encounter somewhere far, far out, sequentially encoded in
ASCII, Lincoln's remarkable Gettysburg Address, but I would not like to
have the task of finding it.
--
(Remove "xyzzy" and ".invalid" to send me email.)
Roger Stafford

Subject: Where to find Matlab 6 to download

From: roger.elliexyzzy@mindspring.com.invalid (Roger Stafford)

Date: 8 Jul, 2001 01:37:07

Message: 7 of 9

In article
<roger.elliexyzzy-0707012343370001@user-2inisol.dialup.mindspring.com>,
roger.elliexyzzy@mindspring.com.invalid (Roger Stafford) wrote:

> In article <d22de2a2.0107071508.50a064e5@posting.google.com>,
> winstonsmith1984@hotmail.com (Tim Wright) wrote:
>
> > John D'Errico <derrico@flare.net> wrote in message
> news:<derrico-6D2CDE.08372106072001@news.newsguy.com>...
> > > Why bother with Matlab 6? Matlab 7 is already written and
> > > available. Its available in the digits of pi (in binary
> > > form.) All you need to know is where to start looking.
> >
> > Is that true though? If pi were an infinitely long random sequence of
> > digits, I would agree. But while pi isn't exactly orderly (it has
> > been proven irrational) it isn't simply random and therefore could be
> > lacking in some sequence of digits, for instance 0100101. Or am I
> > thinking incorrectely and the digits of pi must in fact include every
> > possible sequence?
> >
> > Tim
>
> Tim, you have posed a challenging question.
> .....
> Roger

  By the way Tim, courtesy of matlab's symbolic toolbox, your sequence,
0100101, is to be found in pi starting at the 125th binary digit to the
right of the binary point, pretty much as one might expect of a randomly
selected seven-bit sequence.
--
(Remove "xyzzy" and ".invalid" to send me email.)
Roger Stafford

Subject: Where to find Matlab 6 to download

From: Paul Skoczylas

Date: 9 Jul, 2001 09:27:36

Message: 8 of 9

"Roger Stafford" <roger.elliexyzzy@mindspring.com.invalid> >
> By the way Tim, courtesy of matlab's symbolic toolbox, your sequence,
> 0100101, is to be found in pi starting at the 125th binary digit to the
> right of the binary point, pretty much as one might expect of a randomly
> selected seven-bit sequence.


So where is the Gettysburg Address? Surely the code you used to find 0100101 can be used to find the somewhat longer string of
digits...

-Paul

Subject: Where to find Matlab 6 to download

From: roger.elliexyzzy@mindspring.com.invalid (Roger Stafford)

Date: 9 Jul, 2001 11:39:09

Message: 9 of 9

In article <J3k27.106$BE3.2233@jekyl.ab.tac.net>, "Paul Skoczylas"
<pauls@cfertech.com> wrote:

> So where is the Gettysburg Address? Surely the code you used to find
0100101 > can be used to find the somewhat longer string of digits...
>
> -Paul

  I estimate that an uncompressed version will be located somewhere in the
neighborhood of 2^11728 bits to the right of the binary point. I'll let
you know when I find it, Paul.
--
(Remove "xyzzy" and ".invalid" to send me email.)
Roger Stafford

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