function to produce line graph

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ahamahoru
ahamahoru on 29 Mar 2020
Commented: David Wilson on 5 Apr 2020
Hello,
I am trying to produce this kind of line graph (sample.png). What kind of function should i use for this? I tried checking on tools > basic fitting and the 7th degree polynomial line produce almost similar line graph (plot.png), but with a note 'badly conditioned'. I also tried polyfit function, but it gave me a big curve, very different from the sample.
Many thanks for your help!
  2 Comments
ahamahoru
ahamahoru on 4 Apr 2020
Thank you for the suggestion, I tried to add the two outputs but those gave me a slight difference between that and plot.png result. I found 'fit' function, however, and by using extra 'power1' input, it gave me the exact same line graph as the sample along with the coefficients i needed.
Again, thanks for giving me the idea!

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Accepted Answer

David Wilson
David Wilson on 29 Mar 2020
Edited: David Wilson on 29 Mar 2020
I would strongly suggest you don't try a polynomial fit here. From the context (which you neglected to tell us), I suspect that you havge a good idea what an underlying function should be. Looking at the real plot (sample.PNG), I'm expecting a 1/x or perhaps1/x^2 sort of function.
There are a number of ways to fit such functions, but a flexible way is to use the nonlinear curvefitting routines from the optimisation toolbox. That way, you can adjust the parameterisation as you see fit.
Here's my attempt at your data:
(Since you neglected to give us the data, I've taken rough estimates from your sample plot.)
x = [500, 1000, 1500, 1500, 2500, 3000, 5000, 6000, 11000, 14000, 15000, 16000];
y = [275, 100, 140, 40, 10, 16, 2, 4, 5, 1.5, 0.2, 0.2];
plot(x,y,'r>')
It's hard to see, but I 'm guessing the actual "y" data is never negative.
For my first go, I'm going to try and fit the function
This gives me two parameters, and I'm hoping p_2 will be very small (and positive). Note: there are many other functions I could have used, and you will see acouple below.)
%% Now use lscurvefit
f = @(p,x) p(1)./(x) + p(2);
p0 = [1e4, 0]
p = lsqcurvefit(f, p0, x,y);
xi = linspace(1, 20000, 1e3)';
yi = f(p,xi);
plot(x,y,'r>',xi,yi)
yline(0,'b--')
ylim([-10 300])
Actually this isn't too good. The fitted function goes negative. (If that's OK, then stop readng now.)
We could enforce p_2 to be nonnegative with some lower bounds:
f = @(p,x) p(1)./(x) + p(2);
p0 = [1e5, 0];
UB = [inf 10]; % upper bounds
LB = [0 0]; % lower bounds
p = lsqcurvefit(f, p0, x,y, ...
LB, UB);
xi = linspace(1, 20000, 1e3)';
yi = f(p,xi);
plot(x,y,'r>',xi,yi); yline(0,'b--'); ylim([-10 300])
But I don't really like the resulting fit. Why not try something else, say
f = @(p,x) p(1)./(x.^2) + p(2);
p0 = [1e5, 0];
UB = [1e10 1];
LB = [0 0];
p = lsqcurvefit(f, p0, x,y, ...
LB, UB);
xi = linspace(1, 20000, 1e3)';
yi = f(p,xi);
plot(x,y,'r>',xi,yi); yline(0,'b--'); ylim([-10 300])
which gives a reasonable fit.
Whether that's acceptable, only you, or a domain specialist for your application can really say. I'd say it's OK, and certainly illustrates better behaviour than a polynomial.
Note that I have not taken any particular care in scaling or normalising; (so I live dangerously in these unpresented times). To be prudent, one should scale and range this problem.
  2 Comments
David Wilson
David Wilson on 5 Apr 2020
Take a look at anonymous functions,
To calculate R^2, check out
yhat = f(p,x); % predicted values from the model
SSE = sum((y-yhat).^2)
SST = sum((y-mean(y)).^2)
R2 = 1 - SSE/SST

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